Phillies announce 4 more coronavirus cases - NBC Sports Philadelphia

Phillies announce 4 more coronavirus cases - NBC Sports Philadelphia

When five Phillies players and three staff members tested positive for coronavirus last week, the organization said it was still awaiting the results of 32

When five Phillies players and three staff members tested positive for coronavirus last week, the organization said it was still awaiting the results of 32 more tests. On Tuesday, the Phillies announced that one more player and two staff members in Clearwater tested positive for COVID-19, along with one player who was in a location other than Clearwater. All other tests came back negative. It means that over the last week, at least 12 members of the Phillies organization � including seven players � have tested positive for coronavirus.� None of the eight people with positive tests last week have been hospitalized and the virus appears to be under control in all of them. The Phillies' spring training complex in Clearwater closed last week and soon after, MLB closed all spring camps. The Phillies will hold Spring Training II at home. Hearing Phillies will utilize the Triple A facility in Lehigh Valley, as well as Citizens Bank Park, to space out the group for spring training II, which could begin in a week if/when final health protocols are signed off on.� Jim Salisbury (@JSalisburyNBCS) June 23, 2020 The league hopes to open camps on July 1 and start the regular season three weeks later. The outbreak at Phillies camp was the first known outbreak across MLB. The Phillies closed their Spectrum Field facility in mid-March when the sporting world shut down because of the COVID-19 crisis. The facility received a deep and thorough cleansing. Players rehabilitating from injury were allowed to continue their recovery work under the supervision of a few of the team�s athletic trainers and staff. Over the past few weeks, the team allowed several more players to begin working out at the facility. Strict health and safety precautions were taken and group sizes were limited. Still, there was an outbreak. While it's possible for teams to supervise players at a ballpark, it�s not possible to fully prevent them from interacting with a community that is considered open. MLB on Monday night announced its intention to impose a season, believed to be 60 games in length. The league set a deadline of Tuesday at 5 p.m. for the players' association to sign off on health and safety protocols and declare whether players can report to camps by July 1. Jim Salisbury contributed to this report. Subscribe and rate the Phillies Talk podcast:Apple Podcasts�/�Google Play�/�Spotify�/�Stitcher�/�Art19�/�YouTube More on the Phillies MLB announces it will impose a 2020 season Another Harper is on the way Coronavirus outbreak in Clearwater hits 5 Phillies players The inside story of Chase Utley�s famous parade speech The World Series afterparty at Pat Burrell�s house When MLB announced Monday it would impose a 2020 season, the league requested two responses from the players' association by 5 p.m. Tuesday.� 1) Will players be able to report to camps by July 1? 2) Has the union signed off on the league's health and safety protocols? One of the hurdles has been cleared. The players have agreed to report by July 1 and play a 60-game regular season, according to the NY Post. The players have not yet signed off on the health and safety protocols, so the deal is not final. We would make a joke about the sides' inability to meet the latest deadline in this long, drawn-out, ridiculous process, but the health�and safety issue is complicated, more so than it was even a week ago. It is understandable why that aspect of the deal could take a bit longer to lock down. Within the last week, 12 members of the Phillies' organization � seven players � have tested positive for COVID-19. All but one of those cases came in Clearwater, where the Phillies subsequently closed their spring training facility. When Spring Training II begins, it will be in South Philadelphia and at the Phillies' Triple A facility in Lehigh Valley. Teams won't be facing other teams, instead doing baseball activities on their own and holding intrasquad games. Hearing Phillies will utilize the Triple A facility in Lehigh Valley, as well as Citizens Bank Park, to space out the group for spring training II, which could begin in a week if/when final health protocols are signed off on.� Jim Salisbury (@JSalisburyNBCS) June 23, 2020 Subscribe and rate the Phillies Talk podcast:Apple Podcasts�/�Google Play�/�Spotify�/�Stitcher�/�Art19�/�YouTube More on the Phillies Here's why MLB players passed on a better deal and more money Phillies announce 4 more coronavirus cases Phillies likely facing a brutal schedule in 2020 MLB announces it will impose a 2020 season Another Harper is on the way It'll be great to have sports return whenever that actually happens, but it's safe to say they won't be returning exactly as we knew them. And it's not just the shortened seasons, different playoff formats, or empty ball parks. MLB for example is reportedly considering implementing a new rule for extra innings that had previously only been seen in the Minor Leagues. A runner being placed on second base at the start of any inning after the ninth (10th inning and on)�was implemented in the minors in 2018 to help prevent extremely long games in the interest of player safety. That same rule being implemented during the 2020�shortened MLB season isn't official yet but it is widely expected to happen. Here's what�National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues president�Pat O'Conner said about it at the time: "We believe these changes to extra innings will enhance the fans' enjoyment of the game and will become something that the fans will look forward to on nights where the game is tied late in the contest. Player safety has been an area of growing concern for our partners at the Major League Baseball level, and the impact that lengthy extra innings games has on pitchers, position players and an entire organization was something that needed to be addressed."� Extremely long extra innings games put a strain on bullpens, and given the unique circumstances around a condensed 2020 season and player health in general, it's believed this new rule could help keep teams healthier. Reactions to it showing up in MLB�have been mixed. Unpopular opinion here but this rule is awesome for regular season. Played tons of games this way and honestly it works really well and adds tension, strategy and expedites extra innings. Fans, if you give it a shot, it�s actually kinda wild.� Richie "Dicky Danger" Shaffer (@Rshaff8) June 23, 2020 Gotta disagree Richie. Broadcasted the Drive the past two years. It does nothing to enhance the game. You play baseball for 9 innings, then softball/pinball/wiffle ball starting in the 10th? No thanks. Certain elements of the game simply shouldn't be touched.� Dan Scott (@DanScottShow) June 23, 2020 These rules aren�t bringing new fans. I would rather ties after 12. Stop changing the game for people who love the sport. Same with the speed of play rules. Leave it alone. Same with the universal DH. It�s not bringing fans, I get it for this year, but that�s it.� Bankes III (@pbankes30) June 23, 2020 This is such a bs move. Even considering the circumstances. Let baseball be played the way it has always been played. With waaay less then 162 games, playing a couple 15+ inning games when they happen shouldn�t be a big deal.� Bobby Caivana (@BCaivana7) June 23, 2020 Read More
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